publishing, ramblings, writing

WHY I WRITE IN ENGLISH

Spoiler alert: it’s not as romantic as one might think.

 

Last week, I shared a post on tips for writing in another language. This week I’m tackling why *I* chose to make the switch from my beloved Romanian to English.

I’m an idealist at heart, but my ambition’s molded me into a realist. The switch to writing in another language isn’t easy, instant, or certain, but I don’t regret my decision for a second. It’s also not something everyone will agree with or think is worth pursuing. To each their own.

So why do I write in English?

 

I’m a fan

Back when I was young, I sucked at almost everything. Couldn’t play sports. Didn’t have money. Grandma used to dress me up like a doll. Had a lisp. Super prissy. I was super badass, you guys. I also had the shitty tendency of correcting people and…you get the picture.

The one thing I was good at? Speaking English. I’d learned it through watching cartoons and people started paying compliments, for the first time ever. It stuck. It stuck so much that although I was practically catatonic in class during college, too scared to raise my hand, once I got to my master’s classes, taught in English, people had a hard time shutting me up.

So there’s an emotional connection with this language. When I’m tense or feel uncomfortable in social situations, I notice I drop some English words mid-conversation. My cool factor hasn’t increased since kindergarten, in case you were wondering.

Speaking in English is almost like a safety blanket at this point. I saw people responded to it, so I did my best to learn it proficiently. And you bet your ass I bust out those four syllable words in an argument.

 

Publishing’s not exactly dead in my country, but…

It’s in a slump. The recession hit us hard, guys. The book market is down 40% from 2007 and only worth about 60 million Euros, according to the latest stats. The bulk of that market is taken up by coloring books and tearjerker novels. I write neither. Compare that to the 24 billion market in the US, and you get a (not so) pretty picture.

There’s also a very complex problem relating to distribution, retailers, and Romanians’ spending habits, which I won’t get into. Suffice it to say I did my research when I decided I wanted a writing career and found the national possibilities lacking for my particular goals.

Not to mention the fact that a large part of the novels written here aren’t my style. They veer a bit too close to the literary genre for me, and I knew I’d have a hard time selling my fun, upbeat novels on the Romanian market. The revenues are also abysmal.

Why am I sharing all these facts? Because if you, like me, want a writing career and you’re not from the US, you need to do your research, too. Don’t make a rash decision based on overseas success stories and the glitz and glamour of overnight bestsellers. Know your own market before even considering a new one.

 

My genres work best in a US market

Know thy writing style. Mine doesn’t have a literary bend, for example. I write fun and quirky YA contemporary, and have an obsession with SF, which are more commercial genres. At least the way I write them. I decided early on which market would be best for my preferences. Not that the US market is only made up of commercial books, but it is more forgiving than the market in my own country.

I know some of my friends and professors will stick up their noses at my genres, but I really, really don’t care. I save all of my pretentiousness for my films, and even then I try to tone it down. The idea that only highbrow art is worthwhile and valuable is something that I’ve fought against my entire life and will continue to do so even when I lose all my teeth and get that lisp back. A film or a book can make you think and change your paradigm while also being entertaining. End of discussion (for now, I feel a blog post on this coming in the near future).

 

That’s the short version of it, anyway. There are a TON of other facts that went into this decision, but, ultimately, I had to figure out early on what would work for me and my career goals. Like I said, it’s not for everyone. But if you’re like me and want to make the leap into writing in English, I’m always here to answer any questions.

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publishing, ramblings, writing

10 ROMANCE TROPES I LOVE

A shame-free zone.

  1. Enemies to lovers.

Excuse me, is there anything hotter? You’ve got tension right off the bat, it makes for ah-mazing chemistry, and you’ve got an emotional arc from the premise alone.

Best. Trope. Ever.

The downside is when you read a book and the hero is a jackass, while the heroine simply forgives him, ’cause he has a heart of gold tucked somewhere deep inside. No, thank you.

PS: the novel that got me my fabulous agent has this premise. Just sayin’.

  1. Badass women getting stuff done.

And getting the guy along the way. Because, yes, you can have everything.

  1. Nerd turning into hero/love interest.

Suck a sucker for this premise. I love it either way, nerd hero/heroine, both of them nerds, whatever. I root for the underdog (as long as said underdog isn’t a Mare Sue/ Gary Stu in disguise).

  1. The whole Hades-Persephone thing, which even Freud would’ve frowned upon.

Guilty pleasure, along with anything resembling Beauty and the Beast. Enough said. Hoping for a genderbent one someday.

  1. Star-crossed lovers/ Forbidden love.

As long as it doesn’t resemble Romeo and Juliet. Not a fan, sorry. But two people from different social classes struggling past social hurdles to find each other? Yes, please. Anytime.

  1. A bargain/some sort of deal (fake engagement, etc) turning into a love story.

Again, as long as the protagonists aren’t completely clueless about their developing feelings. It’s a really tough trope to pull off, which is why I always read it, but haven’t attempted to write it. But maybe in the future? *cackles*

  1. Guardian/ward dynamic (prince/princess and his/her general, etc.)

Sucker for power play if, and only if, both of the parties have some type of control. If one of them is completely helpless while the other rules the world, I’m not interested.

  1. Opposites attract.

Can go hand in hand with the ‘enemies to lovers’ premise, but not always. Packed with chemistry and tension. Loooove it.

9. Revenge.

The pay-off’s always good. Tension galore, plus a healthy dose of feels thrown in. Sherry Thomas incorporates this trope into her writing, but she gives it a very, very special spin. Did I mention I love her books?

10. Virgin

Yes, show me the tentative steps one takes when starting to explore his/her sexuality. Don’t make them an idiot, though. Inexperienced is one thing, naive (to the point of stupidity) is another.

What’s your favorite trope?

publishing, writing

OFFICIALLY PUBLISHED

(Originally posted in 2015)

If you’re in the mood for a steamy read and a little Christmas cheer, look no further than this year’s Fuse Publishing romance anthology, THE STOCKINGS WERE HUNG.

And you know what the best part is? The profits will be donated to the UNHCR, the UN agency leading and coordinating international action to protect refugees.

Yours truly has a sexy Christmas story

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Source: media.giphy.com/media

One of the goals I set for myself in 2015 was to get something published (not self-published, because I’ve decided a long time ago that isn’t an avenue I want to pursue right now – or maybe ever). And I’m glad I took this step for such an amazing cause.

publishing, writing

DON’T FEAR THE SHARK

Okay, I went for the snazzy title, and yes, a specific Shark will make an appearance in this post, but it’s not about the ocean’s most deadly killer (apart from those jellyfish, I hear they’re vicious).

 

No.

 

This post is about a topic that’s sensitive, but shouldn’t be.

 

Letting people see and critique your query.

 

For those of you still with me after that revelation, I think some writers (2010-me included), might be a tad reticent to have their work, the words they’ve slaved over for weeks, months, years (?), ripped to shreds by strangers.

 

But it’s what pushes you forward. Unless you’re Kafka and have a very nosy friend who¬†finds your brilliant work and pesters you into publishing it (according to urban legend, at least), you need to get yourself out there.

 

It hurts. It’s more brutal than not.

 

But if you want an agent, you gotta have a killer query. And, thanks to the Internet, now we have countless sites, blog posts and Tweets dedicated to this very topic.

 

I learned how to write queries by having them critiqued. And the best critiquer out there is Query Shark. (Though I haven’t been fortunate enough to have my query reviewed on there)

 

Yes, the dreaded site where queries either go to die or rise like Fawkes. Trust me on this one. Go through the archives, see what worked for other people–and what didn’t–and make changes accordingly.

 

Submit your own.

 

Go forth and swim until your fins drop and every word shines.

 

You can also check out some of Kristin Nelson’s successful queries (and read her amazing blog, PubRants). I also recommend Kyra M. Nelson’s site, as well as the Absolute Write forum.

 

Oh, yeah. And all these resources are 100% free.